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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
is that the price gains were widespread throughout the nation-- 19 out of 20 cities posted increases. the lone exception was new york city, where prices dipped a half a percent. there was more data today reaffirming the housing market recovery. new home sales surged almost 16% in january, lotore an expected and the biggest jump in nearly two decades. so what's behind the turnaround in the housing market? >> the biggest factor is just the fact that prices have fallen to such a level that there are enough willing buyers that see value in this market to come in and basically provide a floor. >> reporter: in fact, investors continue to purchase about nearly one out of every five homes. many real estate experts predict home prices will continue to rise this year, fueled by a dwindling number of properties on the market. in january, the supply of homes for sale fell to its lowest level in nearly eight years. for most people, the biggest impediment to buying a home is not credit score or income. >> it's down payment. most people don't have enough spare cash laying around that they are able to qualify
obesity have intensified in recent years. last september, for instance, new york city's board of health limited sugared drinks and sodas to 16 ounces or less. mayor michael bloomberg praised the prohibition that takes effect march 12th. >> this is the single biggest step any city i think has taken to curb obesity, but certainly not the last step that lots of cities are going to take. and we believe that it will help save lives. >> suarez: and today, continuing her long-running "let's move" campaign, first lady michelle obama-- along with big bird of "sesame street"-- issued new public service announcements encouraging kids to get active and eat healthy. >> no matter what your age, it's important to get your body moving every single day to help keep you healthy. >> look, mrs. obama, i'm getting moving right now by jogging! >> suarez: if a "healthy" trend is developing, it still has a long way to go. as of 2012, the c.d.c. estimated more than one-third of american adults and one out of three of children were obese. we examine today's numbers and the larger challenges obesity still present
should follow the example of a new york city nurse named menchu sanchez. when hurricane sandy plunged her hospital into darkness she wasn't thinking about how her own home was faring. her mind was on the 20 precious newborns in her care and the rescue plan she devised that kept them all safe. we should follow the example of a north miami woman named desaline victor. when she arrived at her polling place she was told the wait to vote might be six hours. and as time ticked by, her concern was not with her tired body or aching feet or whether folks like her would get to have their say. hour after hour a throng of people stayed in line to support her because desiline is 102 years old. they erupted in cheers when she finally put on a sticker that read, "i voted." ( applause ) there's desiline. we should follow the example of a police officer named brian murphy. when a gunman opened fire on a siek temple in wisconsin, brian was the first to arrive. he did not consider his own safety. he fought back until help arrived and ordered his fellow officers to protect the safety of the fellow americans
that are there. now at schools like p-tech in brooklyn, a collaboration between new york public schools and city university of new york and i.b.m., students will graduate with a high school diploma and an associate's degree in computers or engineering. we need to give every american student opportunities like this. and four years ago... ( applause ) four years ago we started race to the top, the competition that convinced almost every state to develop smarter curricula and higher standards. all for about 1% of what we ve spent on education each year. tonight i'm announcing a new challenge: to redesign america's high schools so they better equip graduates for the demands of a high-tech economy. and we'll reward schools that develop new partnerships with colleges and employers and create classes that focus on science, technology, engineering, and math. the skills today's employers are looking for to fill the jobs that are there right now and will be there in the future. now even with better high schools, most young people will need some higr education. the simple fact that the more education you'v
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)